Connecting...

Early Positive News in Offshore Wind

13 Jul 09:00 by Steve Walia

W1siziisijiwmtyvmdcvmtivmtuvmtyvntavndezlziwmza3nje1x20ucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci4mdb4nduwiyjdxq

Early figures for this year showed that Britain's offshore wind output grew by 10pc in January to March, attaining an impressive total of 5.1Twh, in comparison to quarter one of 2015. The statistics were gathered by government sources and show that the UK's total renewable power output saw a 6.4pc increase in quarter one of this year compared to the same period last year.

However, onshore wind development fared less well with a decrease in investment of 10.5pc to a total of 6.4Twh, measured in the same time period and compared to the previous year. Further good news was found in the solar industry, with output rocketing by nearly 41pc to 1.34Twh in total. There were other gains too, with bioenergy technologies growing to 8.3TWh - an 18pc growth rate - and even hydro schemes increasing to 2.1Twh, an increase of 1.8pc.

Britain's most widely used renewable energy is now solar power, which has officially exceeded onshore wind as the leading power source for renewable developments. In terms of total energy share, renewables now have a 25pc market share for the first quarter period, which is an increase of 2.3pc.

Government sources said that the growth rate was primarily due to an increase in capacity, with renewable energy up to 31GW - an rise of 3.4GW compared to the previous year.

The focus now is on the next steps for Britain's green energy industry, which is experiencing greater uncertainty than ever before in the wake of the Brexit vote and uncertainty over who the next prime minister and cabinet will be. After a period of unrest around the Conservative Party's stance on renewable investment and subsidies, the latest period of confusion does not bode well for investor confidence - particularly for projects where overseas investment is required.