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BT Signs New PPA with Scottish Wind Farm

07 Apr 15:00 by Steve Walia

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BT, the telecoms operator, has signed up to a new power purchase agreement that is worth £185 million over a fifteen-year period with a Scottish wind developer.

As a result, thirteen wind turbines located in northern Scotland are now providing the company with 100GW of clean energy every year.

The company has already committed to green power generation and sustainable business as part of its CSR strategy and has subsequently been buying 100pc renewable power since 2012.

It has said that it intends to purchase 100pc of its global energy needs from renewable sources by 2020, using power generated from sources such as wind, sun, rain, waves and tides and geothermal power.

The director of policy at Scottish Renewables said that the deal was welcome, adding that BT's commitment to renewable energy showed that it made sound business sense.

He explained that Scotland already relied on green energy technologies for the greater proportion of its power needs rather than fossil fuels and nuclear energy. These technologies have the potential to produce 50pc of Scotland's total electricity, heat and transport requirements by 2030.

Certainly, for Scotland wind energy in particular is a real success story, with the country receiving 40pc of Europe's winds. Scottish wind turbines produced over 1.2m Mwh of clean power in March that was transmitted to the national grid.

Wind turbines produced sufficient power to meet the electricity requirements of 136pc of Scottish homes, which equates to 3.3 million homes and represents an 81pc growth compared to last March.

However, the issues of subsidies and government policy frameworks still continue to be a problem, particularly when coupled with the uncertainty over Brexit and the question of creating a market that is certain enough to encourage enough ongoing private investment to continue the current growth trajectory.