Connecting...

New York Announces $1.5 Billion Investment in Green Energy Projects

06 Jun 11:00 by Steve Walia

W1siziisijiwmtcvmdyvmdyvmdkvmdcvndkvntkylzeyntc2mdy3x20ucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci4mdb4nduwiyjdxq

Andrew Cuomo, the New York Governor, this week announced that the state would be pouring $1.5 billion of funding into renewable energy developments as part of its commitment to operate with 50pc renewables by 2030.

Called the Clean Climate Careers project, the strategy is working to develop New York's growing green energy economy whilst opening up opportunities for workers to carve out long-term careers in the industry.

The project will be focused around delivering initiatives that escalate energy-efficiency and the growth of sustainable power adoption in order to make the city a magnet for clean energy technology innovators. Additionally, the hope is that up to 40,000 new jobs in clean energy will be created by 2020.

An executive order was signed by Governor Cuomo to commit New York to the promises made originally by the USA under the ambitious Paris Agreement. Additionally, it will be creating a new climate alliance with Washington State and California to signal a more aggressive stance in tackling greenhouse gases, global warming and climate change.

The $1.5 billion of unprecedented investment will be directed to green energy projects such as solar and wind. Solar installations will be added to all suitable public buildings, and energy-efficiency will become a focal point.

The investment will provide additional capacity of 2.5MWh of renewable pour annually, which is sufficient to power more than 230,000 homes. It is also the biggest single investment in green energy to date.

California has recently announced that it will be sourcing its entire energy needs from renewables by 2045 under new legislation that was approved by the state senate at the end of May. Even as Trump threatens to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, individual states and cities across America are forging ahead with their plans to go green.