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Is It Certain That Trump Will Be Bad News for Renewables?

15 Nov 17:00 by Steve Walia

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With the world waking up to a Trump presidency in the USA, the question has been whether he will automatically spell bad news for renewable energy progression. The immediate assumption was that he would, with a stance that has always been anti-wind farms and green energy sources.

Under Obama, green energy made good progress in the USA, and Hilary Clinton had promised to continue this. However, although Trump made anti-renewable comments in his campaign, it's wise to remember that these are not the same as the creation of an energy policy.

It is clear that he is keen to unleash the benefits of shale energy and has said that solar and wind power are expensive - despite evidence to the contrary. He has also said on record that global warming is not happening.

However, the reality may be that a softer stance is eventually taken. Trump is pro-business, and the renewable energy sector is growing fast. Also, ageing infrastructure is a problem in the USA, and the economics of fossil fuels are increasingly unlikely to stack up, especially as wind and solar costs plummet.

Additionally, individual states are moving ahead quickly with their own carbon-neutral plans, and big businesses such as Google are investing heavily in their own renewable energy sources.

The reality is that Trump is new to politics and will need the support of Congress to push forward radical changes. He may find that opposition is stronger than he expected - if, indeed, he does pursue anti-green-energy policies. The fact is that, regardless of American policy, green energy costs will continue to drop until they are more attractive than fossil fuels - meaning that the transition to clean energy is inevitable, if only from an economic perspective.