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Brits back the Net-Zero Transition

  • Publish Date: Posted 8 months ago
  • Author: Steve Walia

​New research shows that UK citizens are strongly behind efforts to transition to a net-zero economy, including the development of clean technologies and the introduction of energy-saving measures. The latest study from the Public Attitudes Tracker [1], delivered by the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero (DESNZ), showed that the vast majority of Brits are behind the drive to create a cleaner, greener future for the UK.

 

The poll results fly in the face of recent media coverage that has sought to link the transition to clean energy to higher customer bills and ongoing economic challenges. Despite these cost increases for many, people are strongly in support of clean energy development and positive climate action.

 

The long-running poll series questioned over 4,000 people this year between March and April. The research found that 89% of respondents understood the net zero concept well, and 82% of respondents were at least fairly concerned about the dangers of climate change. 85% agreed that individuals could reduce the risk of climate change by taking personal action. The same percentage agreed that renewable energy was a positive step forward.

 

Public attitudes towards solar power stood at 81% and for wind power 78%. Around half of respondents said they would be happy to see these types of projects developed in their areas. Hydrogen fuel awareness also grew to 78%, although most people said they didn't know too much about it.

 

Around two-thirds of people living in their own homes said that they had thought about installing solar PV, and many were currently considering it. Where barriers existed, these were related largely to the expense of solar panels and the appearance of the systems.

 

82% of respondents also said they had taken one or more measures to reduce their energy use in the house.

 

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[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/beis-public-attitudes-tracker-spring-2022